Those wonderful snowflakes on the left have been on an absolute rampage ever since the violent protests that took place in Charlottesville a little over a week ago, making it their ultimate goal to rid the nation of any trace of the Confederacy.

Protests have broken out all over as leftist groups like Antifa — who happen to be just as violent as the white supremacist groups if not more so — with demands that statues of Confederate figures be removed pronto.

If the city government doesn’t capitulate to the whims of the mob, these shining examples of sweet humanity — who are under the delusion they are racial equality crusaders — are taking it upon themselves to bring these monuments down, caring little for laws against the destruction of property.

Well, a police instructor from Texas has some information these folks might want to be aware of if they are planning to do some vandalism in the Lone Star State.

You can be shot.

Via Liberty Park Press:

Texas Police Academy Instructor Phil Ryan warns all Antifa and BLM protesters, and anyone else interested in defacing their state statues, that if they bring their attitude to Texas, they could end up dead.

Phil’s Complete Tweet:

As a police officer and police academy instructor, I am posting this as a public service announcement.

In Texas, Criminal Mischief (Vandalism) is a crime. So, let’s say someone is defacing or destroying a monument or a statue, not that it happens, just a hypothetical. That would be Criminal Mischief under Texas Penal Code:

Sec. 28.03. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF.

(a) A person commits an offense if, without the effective consent of the owner:

(1) he intentionally or knowingly damages or destroys the tangible property of the owner;

(2) he intentionally or knowingly tampers with the tangible property of the owner and causes pecuniary loss or substantial inconvenience to the owner or a third person; or

(3) he intentionally or knowingly makes markings, including inscriptions, slogans, drawings, or paintings, on the tangible property of the owner.

As a police officer and police academy instructor, I am posting this as a public service announcement.

In Texas, Criminal Mischief (Vandalism) is a crime. So, let’s say someone is defacing or destroying a monument or a statue, not that it happens, just a hypothetical. That would be Criminal Mischief under Texas Penal Code:

Sec. 28.03. CRIMINAL MISCHIEF.

(a) A person commits an offense if, without the effective consent of the owner:

(1) he intentionally or knowingly damages or destroys the tangible property of the owner;

(2) he intentionally or knowingly tampers with the tangible property of the owner and causes pecuniary loss or substantial inconvenience to the owner or a third person; or

(3) he intentionally or knowingly makes markings, including inscriptions, slogans, drawings, or paintings, on the tangible property of the owner.

Texas Penal Code Chapter 9, which are the laws concerning the use of force and deadly force to protect yourself, someone else, your property, or someone else’s property (could be state, county or municipal property (the peoples). In Chapter 9 under defense of property it says:

Sec. 9.43. PROTECTION OF THIRD PERSON’S PROPERTY.

A person is justified in using force or deadly force against another to protect land or tangible, movable property of a third person if, under the circumstances as he reasonably believes them to be, the actor would be justified under Section 9.41 or 9.42 in using force or deadly force to protect his own land or property and:

(1) the actor reasonably believes the unlawful interference constitutes attempted or consummated theft of or criminal mischief to the tangible, movable property;

Chapter 9.41 states: PROTECTION OF ONE’S OWN PROPERTY.

(a) A person in lawful possession of land or tangible, movable property is justified in using force against another when and to the degree the actor reasonably believes the force is immediately necessary to prevent or terminate the other’s trespass on the land or unlawful interference with the property (Criminal Mischief is unlawful interference with property).

Chapter 9.42 states: DEADLY FORCE TO PROTECT PROPERTY.

A person is justified in using deadly force against another to protect land or tangible, movable property:
(2) when and to the degree he reasonably believes the deadly force is immediately necessary:

(A) to prevent the other’s imminent commission of arson, burglary, robbery, aggravated robbery, theft during the nighttime, or criminal mischief during the nighttime (Night time is 30 minutes after sunset until 30 minutes before sunrise).

Bottom line, if someone is destroying a monument or statue that isn’t theirs, you can defend it by force during the day with deadly force at night.

Just a little tip, from your Uncle Phil…”

In other words, if you are contemplating playing the role of a social justice warrior offline in the state of Texas, you run the risk of making yourself a pincushion at the hands of an armed law-abiding citizen.

The question you need to ask yourself at that point is whether or not you believe in your cause enough to lay your life down for it?

At the end of the day, it’s not worth your life to try taking down a statue.

What the left doesn’t understand is that taking down these statues doesn’t change what happened. Nor does it make up for the wickedness of slavery.

Most folks don’t see these monuments as reminders of oppression. They see them as reminders of states’ rights, as something to remember failures by so as not to repeat the mistakes of the past.

Rather than remove the statues, there is a prime opportunity to use them as a teaching tool about how critical it is to keep the federal government chained to the Constitution and the importance of being consistent in the application of our most important founding principle: all men are created equal under God.

 

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