Once upon a time, many many moons ago, Snoop Dogg was one of the most popular musical acts in the world, selling millions of albums, putting on sold out shows, and strutting himself down the annals of pop culture history.

Recent times haven’t been so kind to Calvin Broadus Jr. as his bright, shining star has since faded and lost it’s luster, which isn’t easy for a musician or any entertainer for that matter, to take when they are used to a lifestyle of superstardom.

So, like any struggling celebrity who craves relevance in 2017, Snoop has decided to join the “I Hate Trump” bandwagon and with a bit of shock jock flare, released his new album cover disturbingly showing him posing with the flag draped corpse of Donald Trump.

Guess he learned nothing from what happened when Kathy Griffin posed with the severed head of the president and her career imploded.

via The Daily Wire:

Dogg (real name Calvin Cordozar Broadus Jr.) teased his new album called “Make America Crip Again.” Very clever. And on its cover there’s a dead body laying on a slab, covered with a flag. Now lest you be stuck wondering who that body is, a giant toe tag has “TRUMP” written in big block letters in black Sharpie.

The cover is nearly identical to Ice Cube’s 1991 album “Death Certificate,” which featured the same mock-up, except the name on the toe tag said, “Uncle Sam.” (Seems like the richest rappers in America really don’t like the country that gave them the opportunity to become the richest rappers in America.)

It’s the second time Dogg has parodied Trump’s death. In March, in the final scene of his music video for “Lavender,” the rapper takes out a fake gun and pretends to assassinate a clown-like Trump character with painted orange face.

The message was clear from the musician as he spoke to Billboard about his thoughts on the president, the Daily Mail wrote.

“I feel like it’s a lot of people making cool records, having fun, partying, but nobody’s dealing with the real issue with this f*cking clown as president, and the sh*t that we dealing with out here, so I wanted to take time out to push pause on a party record and make one of these records for the time being.

“Making a song that was not controversial but real – real to the voice of the people who don’t have a voice. It’s not like [co-director Jesse Wellens] told me to make a record to express what I’m expressing on the song, but there were certain things that he said that brought that feeling, to make me want to express that when I was writing.”

Here’s the thing. It’s perfectly acceptable for him to make a record bashing the president. It’s his art, his voice, his opinion, so of course he can use that how he sees fit. That’s what the First Amendment is all about.

But the thing is, is such an album cover really anything other than a desperate cry for attention? Probably not. He wants to be relevant again, to be in the limelight and sell records, to be on top of the game once more. The rap music industry has changed a lot since his former hay day, so rather than put the effort in to appeal to a new generation, why not just hit on what’s hot?

What one has to wonder is what Snoop’s reaction would’ve been if someone had created a similar album cover with Obama on it? Likely he would’ve flipped his lid and accused that person of being a racist. Suddenly it wouldn’t be a free speech issue, a matter of freedom of artistic expression. Nope, that would get tossed out the window real quick.

The bottom line is, this is an appalling picture, and it would be regardless of who the president was. I wouldn’t support an album cover like this with Hillary or Obama on it either. It’s disgusting and someone who has as much talent as Snoop should be ashamed of stooping so low as to use gross shock value to get his name back out in the open.

 

Join the Discussion

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.