Chick-fil-A is known for more than just their chicken products, which are awesome by the way. They are also famous for their adherence to biblical principles, standing for traditional marriage and closing their doors on Sunday so employees can rest and attend church if they choose.

This company is a prime example of what it means to live out the Christian faith, applying the gospel and the whole Word of God, to every realm of life, including the business world.

While liberals enjoy trashing the company and its leadership for remaining faithful to the Scriptures, its quite obvious their obedience to the Lord has produced a lot of blessings and fruit for the company.

You can hardly go a week without hearing about a story where a Chick-fil-A restaurant does something awesome for their local community.

And that’s precisely what happened in Virginia recently, when a local church group wasn’t able to hold services in their regular building.

The White Oak Community Church usually holds their Sunday services in the ballroom at the Econo Lodge in Sandston. However, on September 3, they weren’t able to use the space.

via TheBlaze:

“Upon arriving to our current worship location we found that the building has condemned signs on the door,” the church posted on its Facebook page. “The only legal use of any of the spaces are for the Econo Lodge to conduct business. We obviously do not have church this morning.”

The post called the ordeal “only a minor setback.”

“Often God sandblasted us out of places in order for us to see the next great thing that he has for His church,” they said. “A little frustrated this morning, but excited for what God has for our future!”

Church leaders began to search for a new worship space. One of the board members, who works at Chick-fil-A, contacted her boss and asked if the church could use the store for their Sunday service. He agreed.

In a video posted on Facebook, Pastor Dave Wilde thanked Chick-fil-A for “graciously agreeing to host us next Sunday.”

“No, they are not serving food … You cannot order chicken biscuits at Chick-fil-A next Sunday,” he joked. “So if you’re a current or future attender, and you always wanted to worship in a restaurant setting, this is your lucky day.”

This is a beautiful picture of how the body of Christ looks out for one another as a family that is dedicated to each other by more than just flesh and blood.

As Christians, we are called to live our lives in community with other believers. The church isn’t just something optional you tick off on your spiritual box each week, it’s supposed to become your way of life, the center of your interactions with other people. All of the ministry you do is supposed to be as an extension of being in the body.

Unfortunately, many folks in our day and age treat church like it is some sort of fast food chain — no pun intended given the content of this article — jumping around to church after church attempting to find one that fits their fancy perfectly.

Rather than looking for theologically sound churches that preach the true gospel message of Christ crucified, many of these folks plug in somewhere they can fade into the background, not get noticed or be forced to get to know their brothers and sisters and serve them with their gifts.

This is disgraceful and not at all the way Christians should behave.

Thankfully, Chick-fil-A and the people who run the company understand that and have provided a great example for us all to follow.

Remember, those who have placed their faith in Jesus are now spiritual family, deeper then flesh and blood. We need to take care of each other and lean on one another and truly become a family.

I sincerely hope this story motivates you to get back involved with your church if you’re not already. You are greatly needed.

Follow Michael on Twitter @MCantrell0928 and on Facebook]

 

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