It’s no secret the mainstream media has it out for President Trump, and they are willing to go to any lengths to create some sort of scandal, hoping eventually something sticks and will lead to either his resignation or his impeachment.

We’ve seen the obsession over the fabled “Russia collusion,” almost nonstop since Trump took office, but the one thing the left has tried to pin on the president ever since the very beginning, back when he first tossed his hat in the ring for the presidency, is that he’s a racist.

Every major news outlet in existence has attempted to drill it in the heads of viewers that this president hates minorities.

The violent protests by white supremacists that took place over a week ago in Charlottesville were, according to progressives, all Trump’s fault. Because why not? Everything else is, right?

Well, not everyone is jumping on the “Trump’s a racist” bandwagon. A group of black pastors are pushing back against the MSM’s narrative in a big way, and it’s guaranteed to make the left furious.

From Western Journalism:

The deluge of liberal invective connecting President Donald Trump and his administration with the death of a woman protesting a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend has it “absolutely wrong,” a black minister said Monday.

Rev. Derek McCoy, executive vice president for the Center of Urban Renewal and Education, was among clergy who said claims by liberals and mainstream media that Trump has fostered a spirit of racism miss the point entirely.

“One thing you need to understand: You are saying that the president is the instigator, and I think that is absolutely wrong. No, it is not disingenuous,” said McCoy.

Activist Star Parker, who founded CURE, said Trump’s initial statement condemning violence on both ends of the political spectrum was on target.

“I would like for us to finally address the ‘alt-right’ and the ‘alt-left’ — the instigators that continue this discussion that racism is so inherent in our society that they are going to look for it endlessly to then spark the tensions of the ‘alt-right.’ The ‘alt-right’ was sent underground. They have been emboldened because of the ‘alt-left,’” he said.

The president’s supposedly “controversial” statement where he mentioned there are violent folks on both sides of the racial divide in this country may have gotten a lot of slack from the politically correct types, but the reality is, he’s absolutely right.

Racism is not a white problem only. Nor is it a black problem only. Racism is a HUMAN problem, the result of living in a fallen world as beings who are born in sin.

Every people group is racist against someone else, though obviously not all people in a specific group are full of this kind of prejudice or hatred.

Every race and ethnicity has oppressed another. This isn’t to demean or belittle the act of racism, but merely to illustrate that it’s an issue as old as time itself, and that if we’re truly going to make strides toward ridding our society of it, we must be willing to first off, preach the gospel, and second off, accept and acknowledge that we all — that is, every race — are prejudiced against someone and need to change.

Much of the problem when it comes to race relations in this country stems from the fact that liberals think just because you’re a white person, that makes you racist and if you’re black it’s impossible for you to hate someone based on the color of their skin.

As stated above, that simply isn’t true.

This group of black pastors are making all the right moves, taking all the right steps to go toward legitimate racial reconciliation, which is exactly what our country needs right now.

A post-racial society is possible, but not without the grace of God working in all people to open our eyes to the reality that we are all image bearers and worth more than the color of our skin.

 

Join the Discussion

We have no tolerance for comments containing violence, racism, vulgarity, profanity, all caps, or discourteous behavior. Thank you for partnering with us to maintain a courteous and useful public environment where we can engage in reasonable discourse.